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Online Training Courses Available

The NJATC has made the following training courses available online. Members must sign up through the JATC and pay their book fees, which will be reimbursed at the completion of the course.  For more information or to sign up for a course, please call the JATC: 785-5167.

 


AC Systems, Level I featuring the Electrical Theory Simulator - 2nd Ed.

AC Systems marks the beginning of study in AC Theory. Lessons covered in this course include a review of DC theory, the use of trigonometry and vector math in circuit analysis, comparing direct current to alternating current, circuit calculations for basic systems, AC resistive circuits, and understanding the basic characteristics of AC circuits. This course also offers a number of lab exercises, each designed to complement the lessons by reinforcement through actual hands-on learning.


AC Theory, Level I featuring the Electrical Theory Simulator - 2nd Ed.
 

After the fundamentals of AC Theory are mastered, the learner will begin AC Theory Level I. This course is designed to teach the learner important AC Theory concepts such as: inductance and how it affects a circuit, inductors that are in series and/or parallel, inductive reactance, capacitance and capacitive reactance, series and parallel RL and RC circuits, RLC circuits, LC and RLC circuits. This course also offers a number of lab exercises, each designed to complement the lessons by reinforcement through actual hands-on learning.

AC Theory, Level II featuring the Electrical Theory Simulator - 2nd Ed. 

This course is designed to teach the learner the important concepts of power factor and power factor correction. The course also provides an introduction to generators, understanding how DC generators work, the design and function of AC generators, and finally introduces the learner to three-phase systems. This course also offers a number of lab exercises, each designed to complement the lessons by reinforcement through actual hands-on learning.

 

AC Theory, Level III featuring the Electrical Theory Simulator - 2nd Ed. 

This course is designed to teach the learner the important concepts of series resonance, parallel resonance, series parallel resonant circuit comparisons, filters, and electronic circuit test instrument. This course also offers a number of lab exercises, each designed to complement the lessons by reinforcement through actual hands-on learning.

 

Blueprints, Level I 

The learner will be introduced to the fundamentals of understanding and drawing bluprints as well as the skills required for reading and analyzing residential blueprints.

 

Blueprints, Level II 

The Blueprints Level II course expands on the concepts learned in Level I. The course starts with a review of basic fundamentals of blueprints and how they are drawn, which is immediately followed with analyzing and laying out circuits. The learner is also introduced to job cost and how to perform a takeoff, blueprint specifications, schedules and component location, and blueprint systems integration.

 

Blueprints, Level III 

The Blueprints Level III course expands on the concepts learned in Level I and Level II. The course starts with a review and comparison between residential, commercial, and industrial specifications followed by a lesson specific to industrial specifications, and finally three lessons on how to read and interpret industrial blueprints.

 

Building a Foundation in Mathematics, Level I w/ text. 

Many skills are required to successfully complete the electrical apprenticeship program and be able to function as a competent Journeyman. One such skill is the ability to apply standard mathematics in the classroom as well as on the job. The Building a Foundation in Mathematics, Level I course provides a review of necessary mathematical skills which are crucial to anyone working in the electrical trade. Topics include operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, exponents, and units and measurements.

 

Building Automation 1: Control Devices and Applications, Level I w/ text. 

Building Automation 1: Control Devices and Applications Level I explains how building systems, such as HVAC, lighting, and electrical systems, can communicate information through a network of intelligent control devices. Emphasis is placed on these control devices and how they work together in common automation scenarios. Topics covered include the operation, signal types, and functions of the sensors, actuators, and other control equipment used in automated systems in commercial buildings. The course is organized by building system, and the operation of each system is explained to clarify the function and application of each control device.

 

Building Automation 1: Control Devices and Applications, Level II 

Building Automation 1: Control Devices and Applications Level II explains how building systems, such as HVAC, plumbing, fire protection, access control, and security systems, can communicate information through a network of intelligent control devices. Emphasis is placed on these control devices and how they work together in common automation scenarios. Topics covered include the operation, signal types, and functions of the sensors, actuators, and other control equipment used in automated systems in commercial buildings. The course is organized by building system, and the operation of each system is explained to clarify the function and application of each control device.

 

Code and Practices 2, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The learner is taken through the process of understanding the principles of the 2014 NEC and applying its requirements directly to the job.

 

Code and Practices 3, Level 1, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The principle purpose of overcurrent protective devices (OCPDs) is to protect circuits and equipment from the effects of harmful overcurrents. This series of lessons will introduce the fundamental concepts of overcurrent protection, the most common types of OCPDs (fuses and circuit breakers) and their characteristics, operation and sizing, conductor tap rules, calculation of fault currents, and ground fault protection of equipment.

 

Code and Practices 4, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

This series of lessons will explore a unique combination of topics. First, the learner will be introduced to a number of requirements related to service equipment, swimming pools, fountains, and similar installations. Next, the learner will develop an understanding of emergency and standby system installation requirements, over 600- and over 1000-volt requirements, and those for remote-control, signaling and power-limited circuits. The final series of lessons examines changes that took place between editions of the NEC and concludes with preparation to take NEC competency examinations.

 

 

Code and Practices 5, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

This series of lessons will explore a unique combination of topics. First, several wiring methods and support for wiring methods will be explored through a look at installation and Code requirements related to wire mesh basket tray, surface nonmetallic raceways, infloor installations, and multioutlet assemblies. This series of lessons will then conclude with a look at NEC requirements for Solar PV systems.

 

Code and Practices 6, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The improper selection and application of overcurrent protection can create electrical problems such as prolonged power outage, fire hazard, shock hazard, arc flash, arc blast, and equipment damage. A properly designed, installed and maintained electrical system provides the benefit to customers and worker safety. Exploration of overcurrent protective devices and their application will continue with a series of lessons covering topics such as OCPD application requirements and considerations for various electrical equipment.

 

Code Calculations, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The Code Calculations Based on the 2014 NEC, Level I course focuses on comprehensive training for solving Code-related mathematical issues. This course covers lessons related to special occupancies, electrical equipment, special equipment, introduction to cable tray systems, installing surface metallic raceways, cable tray fills, ampacity of conductors in cable trays, and electric welders.

 

Code Calculations, Level II, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The Code Calculations Based on the 2014 NEC, Level II course focuses on comprehensive training for solving Code-related mathematical issues. This course covers lessons related to determining conductor ampacity, finalizing ampacity calculations, performing box size and fill calculations, calculating raceway fill, introduction to electrical load calculations, range and appliance calculations, calculating the parameters of multifamily dwelling loads in accordance with the NEC, and calculating the parameters of commercial loads in accordance with the NEC.

 

Code Calculations, Level III, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The Code Calculations Based on the 2014 NEC, Level III course focuses on comprehensive training for solving Code-related mathematical issues. This course covers lessons related to calculating voltage drop in feeders and branch and calculating the parameters of residential loads in accordance with the NEC.

 

Codeology, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

Through repetition and thorough understanding of the "Build" - "Plan" - "Use" concepts, the learner will gain confidence in using the 2014 NEC.

 


Conduit Fabrication, Level I
 

This course is designed to instruct an electrical worker in the basic concepts of conduit bending.

 

 

Conduit Fabrication, Level II 

Level II builds off of the Level I course and covers advanced techniques in conduit bending as well as mechanical and hydraulic benders.

 

Crane Certification for the Electrical Industry 

The Crane Certification for the Electrical Industry training program is focused on the safe operation and setup of cranes and how to properly use load charts and attachments. It covers different types of cranes, booms, and carriers in addition to the standards and regulations of cranes. This program is suited for both the beginner and the experienced operator.

This course is also an outstanding resource for the electrical industry crane operation certification.


DC Theory, Level I featuring the ETS and Labs
 

The fundamentals of electricity and DC circuits are presented and built upon with in-depth coverage of Ohm's Law and its relation to voltage, current, resistance, and power.

 

DC Theory, Level II featuring the ETS and Labs 

This course will expand on the theories taught through DC Theory Level I. Topics include Kirchhoff’s laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, Principles of Magnetism and Electromagnetism, and DC Generators and Motors. The course concludes with a lesson that uses DC Theory to solve real world problems.

 

Digital Electronics, Level I 

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of digital electronic theory. The first lesson gives an introduction to digital electronics, directly followed with lessons that introduce AND Logic, OR Logic, Buffers and Inverters, NAND and NOR Logic, XOR and XNOR Logic, and finishing up with Digital Switching Circuits - Debouncing. Many of the lessons contained in this course are reinforced with hands-on lab assignments that complement the lesson material.

 

Distributed Generation, Level I 

The Distributed Generation Level I course will introduce and guide the learner through various forms of alternative power sources that may be used for critical loads within a specific environment. The course starts by covering information technology sites and critical loads. After information technology concepts are understood, the learner will be introduced to uninterruptible power supplies, infrastructure components, critical UPS system design considerations, installation, and critical systems service. In addition to UPS systems, the learner will be introduced to fuel cell basics, fuel cell applications, and fuel cell installation.

 

Electric Motor Drive w/ text. 

This course is designed to teach electric motor and electric motor drive operation, installation, and troubleshooting principles. The course begins with an introduction to electric motor drives, motor drive safety, and electric motor power requirements and control methods. After the introductory principles are covered, discussion moves to motor drive components, operation fundamentals, installation procedures, and motor drive programming. The course concludes with an in-depth discussion on motor drive start-up procedures, troubleshooting (including required test tools), motor drive selection, and motor drive retrofit procedures.

 


 


Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level I, Based on the 2015 70E
 

Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level I is designed to walk the learner through the basics of Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices. Utilizing a series of questions based on the learning objectives of each lesson, the course is intended to help the learner better understand electrical hazards, lockout and tagout, and the definition of an electrically safe work condition.

 

Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level II, Based on the 2015 70E 

Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level II is designed to walk the learner through the basics of Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices. Utilizing a series of questions based on the learning objectives of each lesson, the course is intended to help the learner better understand when energized work is justified and the requirements for the selection and use of personal and other protective equipment.

 


Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level III, Based on the 2015 70E
 

Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, Level III is designed to walk the learner through the basics of Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices. Utilizing a series of questions based on the learning objectives of each lesson, the course is intended to help the learner better understand how NFPA 70E can be a means to comply with OSHA's requirements for electrical work.

 

Fire Alarm Systems, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The Fire Alarm Systems, Level I course begins by introducing the Electrical Worker to basic systems and the codes and standards that are associated with fire alarm systems. The course then explores initiating devices and notification appliances. Once the Electrical Worker has gained an understanding of the basic components of a fire alarm system, he or she is introduced to common installation, startup, and checkout procedures.

 

Fire Alarm Systems, Level II, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The Fire Alarm Systems, Level II course goes beyond the fundamental lessons to cover advanced detection issues, residential systems, supervising stations, inspection, testing, and maintenance. The course is rounded out with an assortment of valuable maintenance and troubleshooting information.

 

Firestopping Applications 

When fires occur in buildings that are occupied, the occupants are without question in danger of losing their lives. History can certainly demonstrate the dangers that are involved when flames, smoke, and toxic fumes spread throughout the building. Lessons learned from tragic events of the past have improved the chances of survival for occupants of a building when a fire occurs. Easy to recognize are the noticeable fire prevention and notification systems within a building, but there are also systems that aren’t so noticeable, such as firestopping of penetrated walls and floors. Firestopping is intended to stop or limit the spread of flames, smoke, and toxic fumes during a fire, which in turn allows safe evacuation of occupants in the building.

 

Grounding and Bonding, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

This series of lessons will introduce the student to the fundamental concepts of grounding and bonding. Level I starts with lessons on circuit basics and overcurrent protection, Code arrangement, grounding electrodes, requirements for services and grounded conductors, and grounding electrode conductors. The course concludes with lessons on bonding requirements, equipment grounding conductors, grounding electrical equipment, and isolated grounding circuits and receptacles.

 

Grounding and Bonding, Level II, Based on the 2014 NEC 

This series of lessons will build upon the fundamental concepts of grounding and bonding studied in Grounding and Bonding, Level I. This expanded look will start by exploring grounding at separate buildings and structures, the grounding of electrical systems, grounding for separately derived systems, and special occupancies and equipment. Level II concludes with the study of requirements and concepts related to grounding and bonding for communications systems, GFCI and GFPE, medium- and high-voltage systems, and grounding systems and earth ground test instruments.

 

Hazardous Locations, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC 

The hazardous locations course uses both the NEC and the Eaton Crouse-Hinds 2014 Code Digest to present each Article and its requirements.  The knowledge of the hazards involved, and the requirements that mitigate the hazards, will prepare workers to install safe electrical systems in hazardous (classified) locations.

 

Health Care Systems, Level I, Based on the 2014 NEC w/ text. 

The foundation of health care studies begins with a thorough review of the 2014 National Electrical Code fundamentals including definitions and in-depth review of grounding and bonding. In addition, the student will seriously consider many other fundamental electrically-related health care standards in use for the construction and maintenance of present day health care facilities.

 

Health Care Systems, Level II, Based on the 2014 NEC 

Health Care Systems, Level ll expands on the topics covered in Health Care Systems, Level l.  This course also covers anesthetizing locations, diagnostic imaging equipment installations, isolated power systems, pools and tubs for therapeutic use, and working in operational facilities.

 

Instrumentation Introduction - Module 1 

This course serves as an introduction to basic instrumentation topics such as math, science, electrical theory, meters and measurements, vocabulary, and process and instrumentation diagram interpretation.

 


 

 

 

 

 


Lighting Essentials, Level I w/ text.
 

Lighting Essentials, Level I explains the nature of light and the practical application of lighting design. The nature of light, lighting and lighting systems, considered the bread and butter work of an electrician, is rapidly changing. To remain current in what lighting is and what the future holds, Electrical Workers need to understand the nature of light, what needs to be lit, and how to deliver an energy-efficient lighting system. No longer can the Electrical Worker assume that lighting is just the installation of luminaires and branch circuits. Energy codes and the desire to create a more sustainable lifestyle have altered the lighting landscape. This course covers lamp styles and qualities, such as operating temperature range, lamp life, lumen maintenance, directionality, starting time, and life cycle costs. The course also contains state-of-the-art training materials regarding solid state ballasts and LED lighting systems and controls.

 

Lighting Essentials, Level II 

Lighting Essentials, Level II delves deeper into the basic design element for the most common occupancies. This helps the electrical contractor and/or Electrical Worker understand how to fulfill the lighting requirement of the customer in a design/build situation. It also allows the electrical contractor and Electrical Worker to carry on an intelligent conversation with the customer’s architect or lighting designer. Lighting Essentials Level II also contains lessons on troubleshooting HID ballasts and makes an economic case for the use of LED lighting systems.

 

Lightning Protection, Level I 

A lightning protection system is essential in order to provide complete protection for the structure and its contents. This course will provide two integral parts to the understanding of lightning protection systems. Part 1 will describe the basic terminology and components of lightning protection systems. In Part 2, the student will study essential methods for the correct installation of such a system, including design and layout requirements.


Motor Control, Level I
 

Motor Control, Level I explains manually, mechanically, and automatically operated control devices. Both NEMA and IEC contactors and magnetic motor starters are addressed with emphasis on types, functions, and applications. The course concludes with the development and purpose of schematic, wiring, logic, and ladder diagrams, including details on standard drawing techniques for generating and interpretation of ladder diagrams.

 

Motor Control, Level II 

Motor Control, Level II, explains solid state input and output devices. Unique motor control devices, including special purpose motor starters, programmable timers, and function specific control components, are presented. The function and operation of AC and DC motor speed control devices are explained, including troubleshooting techniques and a variety of applications.

 

Motor Control, Level III 

Motor Control, Level III covers analog signal types and analog devices used in motor controls. Advanced topics such as variable speed drives, programmable logic controllers, and networks are presented. The course concludes with detailed methods for system-wide troubleshooting of motor control systems using real-world applications.

 

 

 

Motors, Level I 

The Motors Level I course introduces the learner to theory concepts such as magnetism and induction. After the theory concepts have been mastered, the learner is introduced to motor nameplates, AC alternators, three-phase motors, squirrel-cage motors, wound-rotor motors, and single-phase motors. The course then introduces motor protection, DC motors and generators, starting, and finally NEC requirements and calculations needed for motor installations.

 

Motors, Level II 

The Motors Level II course introduces the learner to topics such as braking, multi-speed motors, adjustable speed drives, bearings, drive systems and clutches, and finally motor alignment. The student will also learn how to troubleshoot motors and decide the appropriate course of action for repair.

Photovoltaic Systems, 3rd ed. w/ text.

Power Quality, Level I w/ text. 

With more and more industries relying on technology for their operations, maintaining sufficient and appropriate power to support these machines and computers is critical. Understanding and being able to troubleshoot power quality issues including harmonics and other power quality issues is an invaluable asset the Electrical Worker must possess. The lessons in this course are designed to instruct the learner on the financial concerns which drive a need for power quality, power distribution systems, and related measurement and monitoring techniques required for an accurate assessment of a facility's power quality needs. Power quality terminology, costs, and concepts and defining the power quality issues that directly affect digital equipment and traditional electrical loads are the objectives outlined within the course material.


Programmable Logic Controllers, Level I w/ text.
 

The Programmable Logic Controllers Level I course is a beginning level course for the study of programmable controllers and focuses on the Rockwell Automation (Allen-Bradley) PLC Systems.  This course begins with basic PLC hardware requirements and the installation of PLC equipment including pilot devices, loads and analog devices typically used with PLC systems.  The course then focuses on basic concepts and instruction types used with programmable controllers such as input and output types and internal functions such as timers, counters, and sequencers.  This course does not provide any training for the programming of PLC systems.

 

Programmable Logic Controllers, Level II A 

The Programmable Logic Controllers Level II A Course introduces programming for address-based programmable logic controller systems.  The course is based on Rockwell Automation’s RSLogix 500 Software, which is used to program both the SLC500 and the MicroLogix series of programmable controller systems.  The course begins with ladder logic programming for contacts and coils, and then proceeds through timers, counters, and other advanced programming instructions.  The course is designed to teach the learner how address-based systems utilize memory and how programming instructions can be used to develop complex programmable controller programs in ladder logic based control systems.  The Programmable Logic Controllers Level I Course is a prerequisite for this course.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                             Programmable Logic Controllers, Level II T 

The Programmable Logic Controllers Level II T Course introduces programming for tag-based programmable logic controller systems.  The course is based on Rockwell Automation’s ControlLogix 5000 Software, which is used to program both ControlLogix and CompactLogix series of programmable controller systems.  The course begins with ladder logic programming for contacts and coils, and then proceeds through timers, counters, and other advanced programming instructions.  The course is designed to teach the learner how tag-based systems utilize memory, and how programming instructions can be used to develop complex programmable controller programs in ladder logic based control systems.  The course also introduces three additional programming languages which can be used with tag-based Allen Bradley systems including Function Block Diagram programming, Structured Text programming, and Sequential Function Block programming. The Programmable Logic Controllers Level I Course is a prerequisite for this course.

 

Rigging, Hoisting, and Signaling, Level I 

This course is designed to teach the physical principles, safety considerations, and common practices involved in hoisting loads. The course begins with an introduction to hoisting safety, crane types and operation, lift planning, signaling, and load weight and balance calculations. The discussion then moves to fiber ropes and knots, slings and sling hitches, synthetic slings, chains and chain slings, and wire rope and wire rope slings. The course concludes with a discussion on rigging hardware, rigging equipment maintenance, hoists, and block and tackle.

 

Semiconductors, Level I w/ text. 

Semiconductor technology is the backbone in nearly every electronic device used. This course serves as an introduction to the wide world of electronics for the electrical profession. It provides the necessary background required to understand the concepts and theory associated with semiconductors, an essential component in the proper installation and maintenance of electrical systems. It examines the basics of the most commonly used semiconductor devices today, as well as common troubleshooting concepts for working with these systems. Learners are given the essential building blocks that will lead to a complete understanding of all aspects of semiconductor electronics. Many of the lessons contained in this course are reinforced with hands-on lab assignments that complement the lesson material.

 

Semiconductors, Level II 

This course expands on the concepts learned in the Level I course. The student will be introduced to JFETs, MOSFETs, and other transistor types, fundamental concepts of amplifiers, differential amplifiers and operational amplifiers, oscillators, electronic control devices and circuits, and finally integrated circuits. Many of the lessons contained in this course are reinforced with hands-on lab assignments that complement the lesson material.


Structured Cabling, Level I
 

The Structured Cabling course introduces the student to premises cabling, the related safety codes, and the TIA/EIA standards and codes. With these fundamentals in place, the course further explains the need for structured cabling systems through exploring the system overview. It covers unshielded twisted pair cables, connecting hardware, pathways, and spaces. After learning about telecommunications cabling administration and grounding and bonding, the student will begin configuring structured cabling systems and their applications. The remaining lessons delve into the advantages and characteristics of fiber optics, as well as understanding fiber optic connections and installations.

 

Test Instruments, Level I 

The course is designed to instruct why special test instruments are needed and how to select, understand, and safely operate them. Knowledge of Voice-Data-Video (VDV), power quality, high voltage and insulation, instrumentation and process control, and special maintenance test instruments prepares the learner to work on all kinds of electrical installations. The course concludes by presenting a systematic approach to troubleshooting necessary for effective test instrument use.

 

Torque, Level I 

This course introduces why torque is important in the electrical industry by explaining torque theory, specific definitions, torque conversion, friction, phases of fastening, and factors that affect torque. The Electrical Worker will be introduced to the basic principles of fasteners, which include markings, class/ grade, bolt tension and strength, nut strength and compression, the use of washers, and thread identification and pitch. The course will also cover types of torque wrenches and screwdrivers, and the required procedures for torque application to electrical equipment such as breakers, lugs, and receptacles.


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